Meet Color Vision's New Advisory Board Members

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Yodit Gebreyes

Owner & Principal Planner, Yodit Gebreyes has a passion for making her client's dreams become a reality. With over a decade of experience, her creativity, outgoing personality and ability to make her clients relax is what has garnered her a stellar reputation among her peers and clients.

With her Ethiopian family roots, Yodit launched Favored by Yodit Events & Designs with the objective of designing stylish, seamless, multicultural weddings and events to fill the void in the market. Yodit and her talented team are best known for their creative ideas, impeccable attention to detail and ability to bring the best out of vendors to make sure everything runs smoothly and turns out beautiful.

Yodit and her one-of-a-kind work have been featured in various premiere wedding, lifestyle & entertainment publications like People, Vogue, Essence, The Knot, Brides Magazine, Washingtonian Weddings and much more. She believes that her success stems from the combination of blessings, passion, determination, and the ability to adapt swiftly to change.

Yodit holds a Masters in Corporate Communications & Public Relations from Georgetown University & Bachelor of Arts in Marketing & IT from George Mason University. Some of Yodit's favorite things are spending time with her tribe, self care spa days after a long work weekend, shopping trips to Target, exploring new cities as a local and anything related to Oprah & Beyonce!

LaToia Jones

Georgia-raised and Chicago-born, LaToia A. Jones is an, organizer, community leader, activist and strategist. Currently, LaToia is the Senior Vice President of Strategy and Business Development at Hustle, a progressive digital outreach company. With over 16 years of extensive political experience in presidential campaigns, gubernatorial races, and countless congressional and local races—her purpose and drive have always been to be the most effective public servant possible. LaToia is also a Truman National Security Partner and serves on the boards of the National Council of Negro Women, National Labor Roundtable, Higher Heights for America, and Generator Development Group.

Whitney Stringer

Based in Washington, DC, Stringer is top lifestyle publicist, marketer, spokesperson, branding and social media strategist with more than 15 years experience. She is known for launching and executing communication campaigns for various retail, education, career development, arts, entertainment, beauty, fashion and hospitality brands. Her work has been featured in places like the TODAY show, USA Today, Washington Post, Essence Magazine, Black Enterprise and more. Stringer earned a Bachelors of Arts focused in Liberal Arts and Sciences/Liberal Studies from Penn State University. Following graduation Stringer served her alma mater in her elected positions as member of the PSU Alumni Association Council, a board member for the Penn State Alumni African-American Organization of DC and as a mentor to students through LionLink. In another leadership role, Stringer served as the executive director for ColorComm, an international career development organization with the mission to advance women of color in the field of communications. In 2017 Stringer was nominated for the Washington Women in PR Emerging Leader Award. During that year Women's Health Magazine also named her a WH Action Hero, for her commitment to fitness in wellness in both her work and personal life.

Michelle Williams Is A Champion For Women's Pay Equality

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By: Bailey Herdé

In recent years, “inclusivity” and “diversity” have become Hollywood’s favorite buzzwords—and the hype has brought results. There’s no denying that women, people of color, and members of the LGBTQIA+ community are getting more attention than ever. But that doesn’t mean that what they’re getting is enough. We only needed to look to the Emmy’s a few weeks ago: of the 24 actors of color nominated across 18 acting categories, only 3 won—and all of them were men. Hollywood knows how to talk the talk of diversity and inclusion, but it’s still stumbling through its first steps.

Steps, however, were still taken. Actress Michelle Williams, who this year appeared on Fosse/Verdon and won an Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series for her work, used her acceptance speech to highlight the value of inclusion: “I see this as an acknowledgment of what is possible when a woman is trusted to discern her own needs, feels safe enough to voice them, and respected enough that they’ll be heard,” Williams said during the ceremony on September 22. She also used her platform to implore those in positions of power to extend the same professional courtesies to all women, and especially women of color. “The next time a woman—and especially a woman of color, because she stands to make 52 cents on the dollar compared to her white, male counterpart—tells you what she needs to do her job, listens to her. Believe her.” Williams, who has been vocal about pay gaps and inequality in Hollywood since the controversy over pay discrepancies between her and All the Money in the World costar Mark Wahlberg, later elaborated on her statements in the press room. “It’s felt like no matter how many accolades I amassed, I still couldn’t make that translate into retirement money or something that felt like long term security. If it was this difficult for me, a white woman in a privileged industry, how difficult is it for women of color across all industries?”

Williams’ conscious choice to highlight the struggles of women of color was an important one. Often “diversity” and “inclusion” are dropped into conversations in the entertainment industry without any specific promises or intention, but Williams had a definitive goal in mind: the elevation and support of women of color. “While tonight is kind of a fairy-tale ending for me and my personal story, there really won’t be any satisfaction for me until the larger message is heard, and that’s what I wanted to pint out tonight.” When established and well-respected actors like Williams throw their support behind women and people of color, it helps improve the entire industry.

Recap: Dope Black Girls Brunch 2019

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Over 200 women gathered on Sunday, September 15th to celebrate each other at the second annual Dope Black Girls Brunch. We honored Alencia Johnson, Director of Engagement for the Elizabeth Warren campaign, Eunique Jones, Founder of Because of Them We Can and Stephanie Rawlings Blake, former mayor of Baltimore, MD. Civil Rights icon Rev. Jesse Jackson gave a warming speech on the importance of the black women's vote in 2020 and beyond.

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Guests enjoyed special cocktails curated and sponsored by White Grape Ciroc, a brunch buffet and sounds by D.J. P. Chris.

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It was a day to remember and we’re already counting down until next year. Check out the rest of the pictures here.

Meet Two Women Who Are Helping Minority Influencers Negotiate And Secure Five Figure Brand Deals

Social media advertising budgets are predicted to almost  double by 2023  and data shows that businesses earn at least $6.50 for each dollar that they have spent on influencers. Despite the space proving to be highly lucrative with a significant return on investment for brands, a common reality within the influencer marketplace is still a lack of representation and diversity.  Black influencers lead trends and dominate conversations online - from beauty and hair tutorials to style hauls. Yet with a quick Google search of the highest paid social media influencers, for the most part, there are not many faces of color featured by top brands.  There are numerous influencers and content creators of color who are doing amazing things in this space, yet many of them are overlooked and underpaid. For these creators, it only amplifies the importance of understanding the business and learning how to skillfully leverage their ideas, impact and engaged following for higher rates and contracts.  Two content creators actively working to bridge the knowledge gap for influencers of color are Shannae Ingleton-Smith and Tania Cascilla, founders of The Glow Up. The private, invitation only Facebook group functions as a space for black influencers to connect, support and uplift each other. Built on transparency, the exclusive group is a helpful resource for budding influencers and seasoned creators alike, seeking advice, connections and opportunities. Additionally, an essential discussion in the group is around money: how to earn it, how to negotiate for more and how to consistently secure five to six figure brand deals.  Via  Forbes

Social media advertising budgets are predicted to almost double by 2023 and data shows that businesses earn at least $6.50 for each dollar that they have spent on influencers. Despite the space proving to be highly lucrative with a significant return on investment for brands, a common reality within the influencer marketplace is still a lack of representation and diversity.

Black influencers lead trends and dominate conversations online - from beauty and hair tutorials to style hauls. Yet with a quick Google search of the highest paid social media influencers, for the most part, there are not many faces of color featured by top brands.

There are numerous influencers and content creators of color who are doing amazing things in this space, yet many of them are overlooked and underpaid. For these creators, it only amplifies the importance of understanding the business and learning how to skillfully leverage their ideas, impact and engaged following for higher rates and contracts.

Two content creators actively working to bridge the knowledge gap for influencers of color are Shannae Ingleton-Smith and Tania Cascilla, founders of The Glow Up. The private, invitation only Facebook group functions as a space for black influencers to connect, support and uplift each other. Built on transparency, the exclusive group is a helpful resource for budding influencers and seasoned creators alike, seeking advice, connections and opportunities. Additionally, an essential discussion in the group is around money: how to earn it, how to negotiate for more and how to consistently secure five to six figure brand deals.

Via Forbes

Howard University Introduces New Executive Diversity Coaching Program

The Howard University School of Business has launched its new Executive Certification in Diversity Coaching program.

The mission is to offer a high-value, industry-leading program that disrupts how executive coaching is presented, embraced, practiced and executed. Program participants will receive a world-class education, best practices and market-ready strategies to enable them to make an indelible impact in their communities, organizations and spheres of influence for generations to come.

The Executive Certification in Diversity Coaching program — ECDC, for short — is a collaborative partnership between Howard University and the award-winning CoachDiversity Institute in Washington, D.C.



Via Rolling Loud